If you like shopping on the internet for your rope (either because it’s hard to find cotton rope near you or because you prefer your bondage gear to arrive in anonymous parcels), then you can buy cotton rope here instead

It looks great on a person, particularly after it’s shined up, and is just a really sweet, responsive rope that does pretty much whatever I ask of it. Hemp never stood a chance, because jute got to me first – as far as rope goes, it’s my one true love. So if you’re going to use it, keep those EMT shears handy. (On the plus side, it’s not expensive to replace when you do cut it.). Summary:. Hemp will do the job, and do it well – but you might want to source it from a known and trusted supplier, as opposed to an anonymous source (a “learn from my mistakes” moment! ) I’ve found hemp to be very different depending on where I got it from – and my Twisted Monk stuff is actually really up there. The knots used in the single column and two column ties which I posted about earlier will do a solid job of holding things in place, but feel free to use anything that isn’t a slip knot. Next we have a Zenith All-Purpose rope, which is a solid polypropylene braid. Exactly what I need. So, to sum up the whole post:.

So if you’re going to use it, keep those EMT shears handy. (On the plus side, it’s not expensive to replace when you do cut it.). I wouldn’t bother with trying to get something to look particularly pretty or to do a complex tie. That said, for restraint, this will generally get the job done. However, more importantly, this stuff is rated. It actually has a recommended load and a breaking strain on the label at Bunnings, which is where I got it.

It usually comes in twisted form as opposed to braided. Update (2018): In my time, I’ve explored two different batches of hemp rope; what I’ve found, is that the supplier and the quality do make a huge difference. I strongly suspect that if you get droplets of hot wax on it, that it will cause stiff melted crackly bits in your rope, and that’s just not going to be pleasant for either the person tying or the person being tied. It’s not particularly strong with the core removed. Pros:. Both breaking strain and rating provided. It’s not hugely expensive. It has this really interesting feature; with the core removed, it actually sits quite flat on the skin, which is why I refer to it as webbing.

And to be honest, I’d much rather be helpful. So I’m going to go into the pros and cons of a few different ropes. Above; undyed five mil tossa jute; below, 6 mil dyed tossa jute. It takes natural fibre dye surprisingly well, given the already existing golden colour. Knowing they cannot escape tends to be part of what does it for them…). If, after practicing a while, you like rope bondage enough to invest more, then look at hemp or jute, processed to be soft.

I’ll even include pictures! Aren’t I just the nicest? I’m going to go over the kinds of rope pictured above, from left to right. The times when I’ve felt it most likely that I would need to use safety scissors to get someone out of rope, have all been times when I’ve been using this kind of cotton rope. So if you’re going to use it, keep those EMT shears handy. That stuff is vastly overpriced for what it is. A Bunnings, Mitre 10, or other hardware store will have you covered for most things; the Internet will get the rest. It’s generally pricier than anything synthetic, and my understanding is that it’s used a lot over in the US. It usually comes in twisted form as opposed to braided. Again, when washed, boiled etc it tends to degrade. That doesn’t mean you can’t do it; it won’t catastrophically weaken your rope, but with successive washes I would start keeping a much closer eye on how much load I put on it.

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